The Way I See It

Posts Tagged ‘stupa

Gyalthang

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Stupa

Stupa

Gyalthang, also known as Zhongdian or Shangri-la, sits in the ancient Kingdaon of Kham, on the Tibetan Plateau. Geographically, it is located in northern Yunnan province, almost on the border with Sichuan. Although under Chinese rule, the region is predominantly Tibetan, with a small population of Han Chinese and other ethnic minorities.

Had things gone according to plan, I would have spent today flying home from a visit to Gyalthang. But the trip was canceled at the last minute and I ended up being able to spend Thanksgiving at home, something that I am extremely thankful for. These images are from September, on a prior trip.

Pilgrims

Pilgrims

Photog Notes
I made these images under some pretty difficult lighting conditions. Stupa was taken in the afternoon, under a bright blue sky with puffy white clouds and strong directional light. The shot was made in the shadow-strewn square, resulting in a bright sky and dark architectural details. In processing, I applied a generous amount of lightening to bring out the beauty in the colors and decorative details. Pilgrims, on the other hand, was shot under a gray, overcast sky right after an afternoon storm. The dull lighting resulted in a rather flat image. To counter this, I applied a teeny bit of Orton effect to give the tones a kick as well as to add a bit of depth. Overall, both images took a bit of work but I’m pretty pleased with the results. They help reflect the colorfulness and vibrancy of life in Gyalthang.

 

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Written by xinapray

November 27, 2011 at 7:07 pm

Choeung Ek / The Killing Fields

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You can read the books and watch the movies, but nothing can prepare you for the reality of the shelves of pierced skulls, the piles of shattered bones and the gruesome statistics. In the silence of the peacefulness, I hear the screams and smell the blood and decay. Walking around the grounds, I try hard not to tread on the shards of bones and the remnants of clothing that the rain-washed ground continues to give up. It is an eerie feeling, one that words cannot do justice. My mind tries to come to terms with the terror and suffering that must have taken place here. It is impossible.

Choeung Ek, Cambodia

Written by xinapray

May 14, 2010 at 10:36 pm

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